Doctoral students to be published in the Journal of Business Ethics

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Doctoral students to be published in the Journal of Business Ethics

February 23, 2012, Courtesy of Richard F. Beltramini

${image-alt} Jenny Franczak and Will Drover

College of Business management doctoral students Will Drover and Jennifer Franczak, along with Wayne State University’s Richard F. Beltramini, will be published in the upcoming edition of the Journal of Business Ethics.

Their article discusses the overall level of ethical concern among future business leaders based on a national study conducted by Drover, Franczak and Beltramini.


The study reveals that the overall level of ethical concern among future business leaders is at a 30-year high. In the article, the researchers also report that not only are today’s college students more concerned about ethics in general but they also have different ethical concerns than those from previous decades.


Building on Journal of Business Ethics studies from 1984 and 1991, Drover and his colleagues surveyed over 2,000 college students at 23 universities across the United States. Specific concerns ranked highly in the study were “ethics related to financial decisions” and “internet privacy”.


“This population accepts ethical challenges as part of the modern workplace,” said Beltramini, advertising and marketing professor at Wayne State University and team member on all three of the Journal of Business Ethics studies. “While some concerns of earlier decades have been replaced by newer issues, our future business leaders still worry that to succeed in fulfilling business profit objectives; they will have to participate in unethical behaviors.”


Also noted in the study is a perceived need to act in one’s self-interest. Despite ethical “lapses,” business executives are not seen as totally lacking ethical standards. Instead, having viewed the media exposure suffered by whistle blowers, the study’s population pointed to a presumed reluctance to express independent viewpoints so as to preserve one’s individual economic well-being.


“Our study has already received considerable interest from the industry – certainly attributable to the impact that the ethical perspectives we studied will bring to bear on the future of business. More specifically, such ethical values are particularly important because they translate into the behaviors of the forthcoming generation of business leaders,” said Will Drover.